.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}

Friday, February 5

Why is Europe the driver of man-made pandemic that's destroying bee hives? UPDATED 2X

Update 4:15 PM EST
The CBS report on the same new research that Tech Times reported on (below) fills in some of the blanks left by Tech Times. Of course I could have filled in these blanks if I'd read the actual research paper but that would just lead to another paper and another.... From the CBS report:
"If the spread was naturally occurring, we would expect to see transmission between countries that are close to each other, but we found that, for example, the New Zealand virus population originated in Europe. This significantly strengthens the theory that human transportation of bees is responsible for the spread of this devastating disease," she said in a press statement.
The research team examined sequence data of the virus samples collected from around the world from bees and the mites that carry the virus. They used this data to construct a path of how the virus spread, determining that it traveled from Europe to North America, Australia, and New Zealand. There was no movement between Asia and Australia, but there was some back-and-forth between Europe and Asia. While they examined other species of bees, they determined that the European honeybee was the main culprit for the virus's spread.
"We must now maintain strict limits on the movement of bees, whether they are known to carry Varroa or not. It's also really important that beekeepers at all levels take steps to control Varroa in their hives, as this viral disease can also affect wild pollinators," Wilfert said.
[...]
UPDATE 11:35 AM EST
I'm also stumbling over the term "pandemic," as it's used in the following report. I read a pandemic as "everywhere" -- global.  But one of the researchers said that if the disease was a naturally occurring phenomenon, "it is expected that it will be transmitted largely among nearby countries." (Countries near Europe.) Okay, but then how is the disease that effects this one particular European honeybee spreading everywhere? 

Maybe the muddle would resolve for me if went to the research paper itself rather than the following article about it, but right now I can't make the time for a reading that I suspect would lead to a study project of several weeks. From what I've read so far about the issue, I think what's clear at this point is that researchers around the world are still unclear on why the die-off of bees is a global phenomenon.  

However, the researchers seem to be zeroing in on the routine transport of bee hives to pollinate flowering crops across wide geographic areas as a major culprit.....  
  
****         
"Furthermore, the spread is manmade and it's due to the transport and sales of bees for crop pollination."

"The researchers suggested that firmer limitations on bee transportation should be maintained regardless if they are believed to be carrying the Varroa mites or not."

The same practice is followed in the United States and probably many other countries that do big global business in flowering crop exports. Why, then, should the transport of bees specifically in Europe be the driver of the pandemic? Could fewer inspections across the borderless EU be a factor? 

Whatever the story science doesn't have long to find the answers. Remember, if the bees go they're taking the human race with them. 
   
Pandemic Decimating Bee Populations Worldwide Is Man-Made And Driven By European Honeybees
By Katherine Derla
February 5, 2016 - 6:35 AM
Tech Times

There is a disease currently destroying bee populations around the world. A new study found that the disease is manmade and is being driven by the honeybee populations in Europe called the Apis mellifera.

The dreaded Deformed Wing Virus is destroying bee hives around the world. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley and University of Exeter discovered that the European honeybee Apis mellifera is the source of the devastating bee disease.

Furthermore, the spread is manmade and it's due to the transport and sales of bees for crop pollination.

Separately, the honeybee Apis mellifera are not deadly to the bee populations. The deadly combination comes when theVarroa mite becomes the disease-carriers. The mite eats the bee larvae then the Deformed Wing Virus casts the finishing, deadly blow. The combination has resulted in major wipe outs of millions of honeybee populations in the past few decades.

The situation is casting doubts on global bee populations in the future. The global bee pandemic carries major biodiversity and biosecurity impacts, which can affect human health and worldwide economies.

"This is the first study to conclude that Europe is the backbone of the global spread of the bee killing combination of Deformed Wing Virus and Varroa," said study lead author Dr. Lena Wilfert from the University of Exeter's Centre for Ecology and Conservation.

Wilfert added that if the disease was a naturally occurring phenomenon, it is expected that it will be transmitted largely among nearby countries. The findings support the theory that manmade transport of bees is to blame for the widespread transmission of the disease.

The researchers suggested that firmer limitations on bee transportation should be maintained regardless if they are believed to be carrying the Varroa mites or not. Beekeepers across all levels should take measures to control the Varroamites in the bee hives. The viral bee disease can also affect other pollinators.

"The consequences can be devastating, both for domestic animals and for wildlife. The risk of introducing viruses or other pathogens is just one of many potential dangers," said University of Sheffield's Evolutionary Biology Professor Roger Butlin. The University of Sheffield made contributions to the study.

The research was published in the journal Science.

[END REPORT]

Comments: Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?